About Regional Center : Jorhat

           The Regional Centre, Jorhat started working at the campus of the Assam Agricultural University, Jorhat in the year 1979. The Centre created its own facility and shifted to its present location in Jamuguri Road, Rowriah, Jorhat in the year 1998. The Centre’s jurisdiction is the North Eastern Region (NER) of the country comprising of eight states namely, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura. The Regional Centre, Jorhat is mandated to generate resource information on land and soil and also develop land use plan for the entire NER using remote sensing and GIS techniques. The activities of Regional Centre are grouped into three categories viz. research, human resource development and capacity building of farmers through farmers-scientist interaction.

ICAR- NBSS & LUP, Regional Centre, Jorhat

Sr.No.NameDesignationDisciplineEmailBiodataPMS
1Dr. U. S. SaikiaPrincipal Scientist & Head (I/c)AgrometeorologyUday.Saikia@icar.gov.inView BiodataPMS
2Dr. R.S. MeenaSenior ScientistSoil ScienceRam.Meena7@icar.gov.inView BiodataPMS
3Sh. Krishna Kumar MouryaScientistSoil ScienceKrishna.KumarMourya@icar.gov.inView BiodataPMS
4Ms. Surabhi HotaScientistSoil ScienceEsurabhi.hota@icar.gov.inView BiodataPMS

Following physical facilities are available at the Centre:
  • A spacious building for office and laboratories.
  • Full-fledged administrative and establishment section.
  • Spacious soil processing and grinding rooms.
  • Well stalked room for storage of soil samples collected from different states of NER. Recently we are trying to give barcode on each sample bottles to extract easily basic information of that soil and site characteristics.
  • The Centre’s activity are divided into broadly five units, namely laboratory, remote sensing and GIS, TSP/SCSP/Swachh Bharat, documentation and administration. The laboratory is modestly equipped with all major instruments necessary for routine physical and chemical analysis of soils, sediments, water and plant samples including Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer and indigenously built saturated hydraulic conductivity set up. The remote sensing and GIS unit is equipped with GIS softwares and technical manpower for related output.
  • A three room training hostel-cum-guest house is presently available. The construction and extension of this training hostel-cum-guest house to a 16 nos. room (including an auditorium with a capacity of 80 persons) is in progress.
  • Work is in progress to make the first of its kind soil museum in the NER. Museum will provide a brief glimpse of the dominant soils (in terms of soil monoliths), land use and lanform  and specific rock types of the NER,  tools and equipments used in  soil survey, etc. Six vehicles are available for field work.
  • The campus also houses 16 nos. of residential quarters along with a children park inside the campus for the staff.
  • Locally designed sand/pebble water filtration unit in the campus for supplying iron and sediment free water to the campus.
  • Office and street lights have been replaced with power saving LED lights. Efforts are being made for solar lighting of the campus premise and installed 6 nos. of solar lights at different places in the campus.
  • A beautiful lawn and garden are maintained in front of the office building.
  • Two small ponds in the campus to recharge ground water.

The Regional Centre, Jorhat is engaged in conducting research on soil genesis and pedology, remote sensing and GIS and land evaluation and land use planning. It conducts soil survey and mapping, nutrient mapping of soils, training and extension activities and collaboration and consultancy work with state governments and other institutions and agencies in this region.

 

Institute Projects

  1. Soil resource mapping of North Eastern Region at state level (1:250,000 scale)

The soils of the region including Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura states were surveyed and mapped on 1:250,000 scale following three tier approach viz. image processing; field surveys and laboratory analysis; cartography and printings. Soil physiographic models were used for mapping the soils of the region and maps are published state wise on 1:500,000 scale. The soil mapping units are the association of soil family. Legend includes major landforms, soil depth class, drainage, particle size class, surface texture and erosion.

  1. Soil resource mapping for district planning (1:50,000 scale)

For district level planning soil resource mapping was conducted on 1:50,000 scale with soil series association as mapping unit including Jorhat, Sibsagar, Marigaon and Kamrup districts of Assam, East Khasi Hills and Ri-Bhoi districts of Meghalaya and parts of Lohit and Tirap districts of Arunachal Pradesh.

 

  1. Soil nutrient status mapping for Assam and Tripura States

Site Specific Nutrient Management (SSNM) is the most logical solution to address nutrient use efficiency. Soil nutrient mapping based on geo-referenced soil sampling, laboratory analysis, structuring data base in a GIS platform and subsequent interpolation can give a clear indication of the impact of land use and management on changing soil fertility scenario on a real time scale. The geo-referenced soil nutrient maps will be helpful as fertilizer decision support tool for nutrient application in a site specific mode. Soil Nutrient Mapping of South, West, North and Dhalai districts of Tripura at 2.0 km interval grid spacing and for 13 priority districts of Assam (now 16) including Barpeta, Bangaigaon, Goalpara, Kokrajhar, Nalbari, Sonitpur, Darrang, Udalguri, Nagaon, Marigaon, Chirang, Baksa, Lakhinpur, Dhemaji, Tinsukia and Karbi-Anglong districts at 1.0 km grid spacing have been accomplished.

 

  1. Soil erosion assessment for monitoring soil degradation status

Following multi-criteria overlay, several critical parameter of soil erosion was integrated in GIS for Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura states. The assessment of soil loss revealed that in Assam state, severe (20-40 t/ ha/ yr) to very severely (>40t/ ha/ yr) eroded soils together occupies 43.13% of area, whereas, in Meghalaya and Nagaland, severe (20-40 t/ ha/ yr) to extremely severely (>80 t/ ha/ yr) eroded soils together occupied 52.91% and 79.38% of area of the states respectively.

 

  1. Land resource inventory of Jhum intensified areas of Mokokchung district, Nagaland

Mokokchung is regarded as one of the most jhum intensified districts of Nagaland. The land use land cover (LULC) statistics of the district indicate that shifting agriculture (Jhum) occupies 6.31% of the total geographic area (TGA) of the district. Agricultural crop land and plantation occupy only 1.51 and 0.60% of the TGA, respectively. The major area of the district is under forest cover, which is around 88% of the TGA (including scrub forest and other vegetation) of the district. Mokokchung district of Nagaland represents the Purvanchal Hills of North Eastern Ranges of Eastern Himalayas. The soil resources of the jhum intensified areas of the district are mapped into 8 phases of 5 soil series. Soil resource study indicates that soils of jhum lands on high hills with steep (25-33%) to very steep (>33%) slopes and medium hills with very steep slopes (>33%) are Hapludults with clay CEC more than 16 cmolc kg-1. The soil resources on medium hills with strong (10-15%) to steep (25-33%) slopes are highly weathered Kandiudults with low activity clays (<16 cmolc kg-1 clay CEC). Soils of jhum lands on low hills with moderately steep (15-25%) slopes are relatively less weathered (base saturation > 35%) Kandiudalfs with clay CEC less than 16 cmolc kg-1, whereas, the soils on low hills with moderate (5-10%) to strong (10-15%) slopes are Dystrudepts

 

  1. Land resource inventory of Bishalgarh Block of Sepahijala District, Tripura

Bishalgarh block of Sepahijala district of Tripura lies between 23°36ˊ51˝ to 23°45ˊ02˝ N latitude and 91°08ˊ58˝ to 91°23ˊ00˝ E longitudes. The low productivity of agricultural crops in the block is the combined effect of problems of the soils, water and climate. Major soil problems are soil acidity, soil erosion, light soil texture, low fertility status. Besides these, natural disasters like heavy rains and overflow of water causing severe flood and/or water-logging and damage to rice and other crops.

Based on major problems like soil reaction (pH), soil fertility, soil erosion and drainage condition, 4 land management units (LMU) have been delineated in the block. In each soil management unit, the present land-use and alternate land-use options were suggested. Rubber plantation with application of recommended dose of NPK was suggested for LMU 1 having very deep, excessive to well drained, very strongly acidic, sandy loam to silty clay loam soils (Typic Hapludults), and moderate to severe erosion problem.

 

  1. Land resource inventory of Mangan block of North Sikkim district, Sikkim

Mangan block of North Sikkim district, Sikkim represents Eastern Himalayas and Mountain Ranges. Soils of the block are mapped into 17 phases of 9 soil series. Soils of the Mangan block are grouped under four land management units (LMUs) with different constraints of very severe soil erosion, gravelliness, strongly acidic and shallow depth and suitable management options were suggested.

 

 

  1. Characterizing the soil resources in fluvial landforms of Majuli Island for land use using remote sensing and GIS

A reconnaissance soil survey was carried out on 1:50,000 scale. The island has 43.2 per cent of area under sand bars, 13.6 percent of swamps 22.6 percent of flood plains (active and old), 11.8 percent of channel fills and 8.9 percent of natural levees. Thirteen soil series are identified and mapped into twenty five soil mapping units. Soils were evaluated for their suitability to twelve crops namely rice, wheat, mustard, potato, cabbage, peas, french bean, tomato, maize, alfalfa, cowpea and banana. The rice, mustard, cabbage, potato, french bean, tomato, maize, alfalfa, cowpea cropping system is mostly found suitable in channel fills (6.34 per cent) and active flood plains (7.8 percent). The rice-wheat, mustard, cabbage, pea, french bean, maize, alfalfa, cowpea system is suitable in Active flood plains (4.31 percent) and old flood plains (3.99 percent). The rice-potato, french bean, cabbage, peas, maize, alfalfa is suitable for active flood plains (4.42 per cent) whereas potato, cabbage, alfalfa, french bean, peas, cowpea, tomato system in natural levees during post rainy season only (9.3 percent).

 

  1. Mapping and assessment of nutrient status of soils in River Island Majuli, Assam
    The status of available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium of surface horizons of soil series were considered to derive five categories of fertility ratings viz., MLH, MLM, HLM, HLH, HMH. This rating scheme was followed for mapping unit groupings and in developing thematic map of nutrient status. The mapping units are grouped and estimated area under different categories. The six mapping units:- Adielengi - Bhakat –Chilkala, Bangaon-Bhakat-Garumara, Bharaki-Chilkala-Adielengi, Chilkala-Adielengi-Bhakat, Garumara-Bangaon and Kamalabari-Garumara-Bangaon have medium N, low P and medium to high K status. The other mapping units have high N, low P and high K status. The nutrient status shows distinct variation in soils on northern and southern banks of island. The soils in northern bank have high contents of NPK as compared to southern bank. Irrespective of soils in different land forms and textural variations, all soils are deficient in DTPA extractable Zn below the critical limit of 0.8 mg kg-1.

 

  1. A sustainable cropping system for rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Jorhat district of Assam

      In order to evolve a suitable cropping system for rice fallows two early maturing (120-130 days) varieties viz. Satya and Basundhara of rice were tested at different sites of Nagaon and Jamuguri village. Satya variety of rice performed better at both the sites than Basundhara registering an increase of 19.08% and 27.59% in seed yield over Basundhara at Nagaon and Jamuguri, respectively. The effect was more pronounced at Jamuguri than Nagaon soils. Combined use of SSP+MRP in 1:1 proportion resulted into a yield gain of 58.76 to 60% at Jamuguri pedon against 32.92-33.7% at Nagaon pedon over no P. Combined of SSP+MRP in 1:1 proportion proved advantageous than alone application of either sources. SSP proved better than MRP. Potato planted under residual P and moisture in rice fallows resulted in to a yield of 118.75 q/ha at Nagaon. Application of P to rice exerted considerable residual influence on potato. However, the yield of potato did not show considerable difference due various sources of P. The highest total productivity (110.90 q/ha) in terms of rice equivalent, production efficient (45.63 kg/ha/day) and land use efficiency (66.54%) was observed when potato was grown after Satya variety of rice under P and SSP + MRP (1:1 ratio) at Nagaon pedon. Experimental findings obviously indicated that rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Jorhat district, Assam can be successfully exploited by short season crops like black gram, green gram in spring/summer season and potato, rapeseed, french bean and peas during winter season with sizeable yield and monetary advantage.

 

  1. Soil resource mapping of Kamrup district (1:50,000) of Assam for land use planning
    Forty soil series have been identified and they have been mapped on 1:50,000 scale with 33 soil mapping units at association of soil series. About 41% area of Kamrup district was level to nearly level (0-1% slope). Steep to very steep sloping areas (>50%) cover an area of 19.38%. Nearly 19% of total geographical area of the district is under slight erosion, 30% area under moderate erosion and 13% under severe to very severe erosion class. The soils of the district belong to 4 soil orders, 7 sub-orders and 13 great groups and 20 sub-groups. Inceptisols were the dominant soil order (34.09% of TGA) followed by Entisols (29.89% of TGA), Ultisols (16.03% of TGA) and Alfisols (14.11% of TGA). The most extensive areas are very strongly acidic soils (pH 4.5-5.0) covering 52.13% of area. The organic carbon status of surface soil in the district has been grouped into 4 classes and 79.47% area of the district belongs to high category. The soil mapping units in the district have been grouped into 5 land capability subclasses based on the dominant soils in a unit. The most extensive class is IVsw (25.81%) occurring mostly in alluvial plain and flood plain. VIes class dominantly belongs to hilly region of the state.

 

  1. Studies on infiltration, hydraulic conductivity and moisture storage of some soils of Jorhat district, Assam

Twenty sites from different physiographic units of Jorhat district have been selected for the study. The infiltration class for sandy/loam texture in forest soils is moderately rapid. The tea garden soils have four permeability classes viz. moderate (loam/sandy clay loam), rapid (sandy loam/loam), moderately rapid (sandy loam/loam/silty clay loam) and moderately slow (sandy loam). The rice soils have only three classes viz. moderately slow (clay loam, loam, sandy loam), moderate (sandy loam) and moderately rapid in silt loam textures. It is observed that rice soils have retained more water than tea garden and forest soils. In rice soils, clay loam soils retained more stored water than loamy and sandy loam soils. In case of Tea garden soil, silty clay loam retains more water than loam and sandy loam. Similarly in forest soils, silty clay loam/silt loam soils retain more water than sandy loam soil. It is apparent from the study that texture, bulk density have influence on infiltration rate. To confirm the results at regional level, this study may extend further to develop regional level prediction and integrating data base for post rainy crop management strategies in paddy fallows of Brahmaputra valley.

 

  1. Detailed soil survey of Regional Rain- fed lowland rice research station farm, Gerua, Kamrup district, Assam 

The farm is located at 26°11’N latitude and 94°47’E longitude comprising of an area of 12.5 ha. The soils of the farm have been developed on alluvium brought down by the river Brahmaputra. Depending upon the land situation the farm has been divided into 4 categories of landforms viz. medium land, moderately low land, low land and extremely low land. A high intensity detailed soil survey was carried on 1:5000 scale base map supplied by RRLRRS, Gerua and three soil series namely Gerua A, Gerua B and Gerua C have been identified and mapped. Soil pH ranges from 5.3 to 7.5. Organic carbon content in soils ranges from 0.27 to 1.87 gmkg-1. Available Nitrogen content of surface soils of the farm ranges from 150.86 to 678.89 kgha-1. The available phosphorus content in the soils of the farm ranges from 0.254 kgha-1 to 17.95 kgha-1 which have been rated as very low. Available potassium content in soils are dominantly low (<108 kgha-1) to high (>280 kgha-1) covering 93.52 percent and 0.26 percent area respectively.

 

  1. Soils of Bhareli River Basin for Land Use Planning

The Bhareli river basin locating in between 26o02’45” to 27o09’55” N and 93o01’25” to 95o33’05” E covers an area of 1,53,737 ha. The upper part of the basin area comprising hilly terrain with moderately steep (15-30%) to very steep slope (>50%) belongs to Arunachal Pradesh and the lower part with nearly level (0-1%) to gently sloping (3-5%) land to Assam. River Bhareli drains the area to river Brahmaputra. The area has been divided into eight physiographic units viz. hilly terrain, piedmont zone, alluvial fan, flood plain, alluvial plain, aggraded valley, sand/gravel bar and inselberg. Reconnaissance soil survey has been carried out by using topobases on 1:50,000 generated through interpretation of satellite imagery and toposheet. 13 soil series have been identified and mapped in 10 soil mapping units at the level of association of soil series. Three orders viz. Entisols, Inceptisols and Alfisols have been identified covering 12570.74 ha, 77206.00 ha and 841.71 ha respectively.  Five family classes viz. sandy, coarse-loamy, fine-loamy, fine and loamy-skeletal have been identified. Inceptisols further have been divided into 4 subgroups viz. Fluventic Dystrudepts, Typic Dystrudepts, Humic Dystrudepts and Pachic Dystrudepts.

 

  1. Land resource inventory of North West Jorhat development block, Jorhat district, Assam

The study area represents the Upper Brahmaputra Valley Zone  with  hot, per-humid eco-sub region (AESR 15.4), occupying a total geographic area (TGA) of 30,700 ha. The major landforms in the region are older flood plains (31.4% of TGA) followed by younger flood plains (31.1% of TGA), active flood plains (9.4% of TGA), marshes and swamps (6.0% of TGA), channel fills (5.8% of TGA) and wet lands (1.8% of TGA). Agricultural lands occupied 60.3% of TGA in the block, whereas, built-up areas include 19.7% of TGA.  

Soil-landform relationship study shows that soils on active flood plains were somewhat poorly drained, loamy sand to sandy loam in surface and has lithological discontinuity below 25 cm due to fluvial cycles of Brahmaputra with matrix colour ranging from 10 YR to 2.5 Y with chroma of 2 or less. These soils were classified as Typic Udipsamments and Typic Fluvaquents. Soils on younger flood plains were poorly drained with prominent redoximorphic features below 50 cm and completely gleyed below 75 cm with loam to silt loam texture in surface and silt loam to sandy loam in sub-surface with occasional lithological discontinuity shown by sand layers below 50 cm due to previous flood history of Barhmaputra river and were classified as Typic Dystrudepts and Fluventic (or Arenic) Endoaquepts. Soils in marshes and swamps were poorly drained, silt loam texture in the surface and silty clay loam to silty clay in the sub-surface with gradual increase in clay with depth forming a relatively compact layer and clay films below 50 cm from the surface. These soils were classified as Typic Endoaqualfs and Fluventic Endoaqualfs. Soils on older flood plains were moderately well drained, silt loam to silty clay loam texture in the surface and silty clay loam to clay loam and silty clay in the sub-surface with disturbed broken argillans between 50-75 cm from the surface and were classified as Typic Hapludults.

 

  1. Land resource inventory of Medziphme block of Dimapur district, Nagaland

Detailed soil survey at 1:10,000 scale was carried out in the Medziphema block of Dimapur district, Nagaland occupying an area of 63,262 ha land. The soil landform relationship indicated that the soils of the higher elevations i.e., highly dissected hills, rolling foot hills and inter hill valleys were Ultisols with an exception of the soils of piedmont areas which were Alfisols. The soils of flood plains were Alfisols and the soils of meander plains were Entisols. While in the flood plains, the soils were developed from colluvio-alluvial materials and were very deep. The soils of piedmont and inter hill valley were developed from colluvium and were deep.  Soils of highly dissected hills were developed from weathered sandstone and were very deep. The soils of rolling foot hills were also developed from weathered sandstone, but were moderately deep.

The soils are extremely acid (pH 3.5-4.4) to strongly acid (pH 5.1-5.5) as a result of acidic parent materials and high rainfall. Majority of soils (78.3%) had poor base saturation (<35%). In general, the cation exchange capacity of the soils was low and 67.2% of the block had soils with a CEC of <5.0 cmol (p+) kg-1. Available iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) were in sufficient concentrations. In general, available phosphorus was low in the Medziphema block due to its fixation. Available nitrogen content varied from 171.20 to 539.4 kg ha-1, whereas, the range of available phosphorus and available potassium were 25.7 to 49.8 kg ha-1 and 87.4 to 201.60 kg ha-1, respectively. Soil organic carbon content was medium (0.4-0.75%) to high (>0.75%) in majority of the soils mainly due to vegetation cover on soils. Mhainamsti soils are moderately suitable for pineapple cultivation, whereas the Molvom, Razaphema, Vadey East and Upar Badey soils are moderately suitable for paddy. Judicial application of lime is beneficial for higher crop yields in extremely acid (pH 3.5-4.4) to strongly acid (pH 5.1-5.5) soils. 

 

  1. Land resource inventory of Diyun block, Changlang district, Arunachal Pradesh

The land resource inventory (LRI) of Diyun block, Changlang district, Arunachal Pradesh (16.3 AESR)   was carried out at large scale (1:10000) occupying the geographical area of 25,750 ha. The climate is warm to hot per humid with udic moisture and hyperthermic temperature regimes. In general the geology is alluvium, but soils of Dupitila, and Dihing series have been developed on sand stone and shale. The area is affected by severe soil erosion, owing to unstable geology, high rainfall and flooding. Soil-landform relationship shows that soils in hills are fine textured at summit and coarse texture in mid slope and foot hill. Gravels, cobbles and rounded stones having smooth surface were common in entire depth of the profile.  The soil colour at hill summit varied from 10YR 3/1 to 2.5YR 4/4 whereas in the side slopes it varied from 10YR 3/1 to 10YR 3/4 and are classified as Typic Hapludults. The soils in the interhill valley are coarse textured, sand to sandy loam and soil colour varied from 10YR 5/3 to 2.5Y5/1. Lithological discontinuity was found after a depth of about 70 cm and was classified as Aquic Psamments. In the upper piedmont, dominant texture is sandy loam to sandy clay loam but in the lower piedmont it was sandy loam to loamy sand with occasional irregular variation in texture due to deposition of colluvial as well as alluvial materials and are classified as Typic Hapludepts and Fluventic Dystrudept, respectively. In the uplands and flood plains, soils are generally fine textured. The  colour of upland soils varied from 10YR 5/3 to 10YR 3/2 and are classified as Typic Dystrudepts.  The colour of flood plain soils varied from 10YR 3/1 to 5YR 5/1, mottles were found within 50 cm depth due to high water table and classified as Typic Endoaqualfs.

 

  1. Land Use Planning of Diring-Thanglong Micro-watershed of Karbi-Anglong and Golaghat Districts of Assam under Hill & Mountain Ecosystem for Integrated Development (NBSS Report No. 1058, 2013)

A detailed survey (at 1: 12,500) scale has been carried out in Diring-Thanglong micro watershed situated in the border of Golaghat and Karbi-Anglong districts of Assam towards land use planning for integrated development.  Precision geo-coded IRS P6 LISS-IV (March-April, 2011) and LANDSAT ETM (Extended Thematic Mapper) imageries along with Survey of India Toposheets were used as base maps. The watershed has been identified as an integral part of Diphlu watershed and was specified under Watershed Atlas of India (SLUSI, 1990) as “3B2E3”. Nine landform units were recognized in the watershed including steep hills, isolated hillocks, upper piedmonts, lower piedmonts, inter-hill valleys, narrow valleys, gently to very gently sloping uplands, foot hill plains and flood plains. The watershed has 5th order complex drainage network. Drainage morphometry explains structural complexity and highly desertedness of the terrain features of the watershed. Five erosion susceptible zones were assessed viz., slight, moderate, moderately severe, severe and very severe based on ranking of drainage morphometric parameters. Ten soil series were recognized in the watershed viz., Diring-1, Diring-2, Diring-3, Diring-4, Diring-5, Thanglong-1, Thanglong-2, Thanglong-3, Bochagaon-1 and Bochagaon-2 with mapping units (15 nos.) as phases of series. Moderately deep, excessively well drained, loamy soils were formed on isolated hillocks and were classified as Ruptic Ultic Dystrudepts. Moderately deep to deep, well drained, fine soils occurred on upper piedmont and deep, well drained, fine soils occurred on lower piedmont regions and were classified as Typic Hapludults. Soils on inter-hill valleys were moderately shallow with lithic contact within 50 cm from the surface horizons and were classified as Lithic Dystrudepts, whereas, soils on narrow valleys, were deep, poorly drained as gleyed in sub surface layers for as long as 3 consecutive months and classified as Fluventic Endoaquepts. Soils on gently to very gently sloping uplands were very deep and well drained and classified as Ruptic Alfic Dystrudepts. On foot hill plains and flood plains, soils were very deep and imperfectly drained and classified as Fluventic Dystrudepts. The soils varied from very strongly acid (pH 4.5-5.0) to weakly acid (pH 6.0-6.5) in reaction, whereas, organic carbon status ranged from medium (0.40-0.75%) to high (>0.75%). Cation exchange capacity of soils were recognized in three categories viz.,  from 10.0 to 12.5 cmol (p+) kg-1, 12.5 to 15.0 cmol (p+) kg-1 and more than 15.0 cmol (p+) kg-1. Base saturation of soils ranged from low (<35%) to medium (50-80%) depending upon the internal drainage situations and ion exchange behaviour of soils. Available nitrogen and potassium were in medium ranges of concentrations, whereas, available phosphorus ranges from low to medium concentrations. Available iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) were in sufficient range of concentrations. The land capability classification has shown variation in capability classes from II to IV with limitations of high relief features and erosional processes in hilly terrains and wetness and root zone limitations on plains. In the watershed, three productivity classes viz., ‘poor’, ‘average’ and ‘good’ were recognized for field crops and three productivity classes viz., ‘extremely poor’, ‘average’ and ‘good’ were recognized for plantation crops. Soil site suitability for arecanut, black gram, cabbage, citrus, mustard, pineapple, rice, rubber and tea were evaluated. Suitability varied from high, moderate to marginal for arecanut, pineapple, tea, moderate to marginal for black gram, cabbage, citrus and rice and marginal for mustard and rubber. The watershed has been grouped into nine priority zones. It has been observed that priority zones 4, 5 and 6 are suitable for Agri-sylviculture, whereas, priority zones 7, 8 and 9 are suitable for plantation and as well as for rabi cropping. Very severe erosion susceptibility in priority zones 1, 2 and 3 restrict lands for choices of crops. Suitable soil and water conservation measures can be taken up viz., vegetative bunds, bench terracing, contour ditching etc., in priority zone 2, and of small water harvesting units may be constructed in priority zones 1 and 3.

 

  1. Land Resource Inventory of East Lahing Gaon Panchayat of East Jorhat Development Block, Jorhat District, Assam (NBSS Report No. 1060, 2014)

Land resources of East Lahing Gaon Panchayat of East Jorhat Development Bock of Jorhat district are evaluated through detailed soil survey approach at 1: 12, 5000 scale. IRS P6 LISS-IV imageries have been used in conjunction with Google Earth image and available Cadastral maps (1: 4000 scale) of the concerned area as base maps. Four broad types of landform features are recognized viz., (i) Very gently sloping uplands (1-3% slope) covering an area of 44.2 ha (65.8% of TGA),  (ii) nearly level plains covering 487.6 ha (64.2%), (iii) upper terrace covering 19.7 (2.6%) and (iv) flood plains covering 124.7 ha (16.4%) area. Five Soil Series were established, viz., Seojipam, Changmai, Janzi, Panitola and Churamoni Series with ten mapping units as phases of series. Soils on very gently sloping uplands were very deep, yellowish brown in matrix colour with dark coloured surface horizons, moderately well to well drained, loamy texture in surface and clay loam in subsurface horizons and classified as Typic Hapludults. Soils on nearly level plains comprised variability in physico-chemical and morphological characteristics.  Soils on tea plantation have dark coloured surface horizon followed by brownish yellow sub surface horizons, very deep, sandy loam to sandy clay loam texture in surface and sandy clay loam in subsurface horizons and classified as Ruptic Ultic Dystrudepts. Soils on paddy and orchard lands were very deep, imperfectly drained, yellowish brown in colour with relatively dark surface horizons, sandy loam to silt loam in surface texture and sandy loam to loam texture in sub surface and classified as Fluventic Dystrudepts. Soils on upper terrace with orchards plantations were very deep, imperfectly drained, brownish yellow in colour with relatively dark surface horizons, sandy loam to loam in surface texture and loam in sub surface texture and classified as Fluventic Dystrudepts. Soils on flood plains were very deep, poorly drained, grayish yellow to yellowish brown in colour, silt loam to silty clay loam in surface texture and silty clay loam in sub surface texture, massive structure in surface and classified as Fluventic Endoaquepts. Soils were classified into five classes of surface texture, viz., loam (11.6% of TGA), sandy loam (40.4%), silt loam (21.8%), sandy clay loam (11.8%) and silty clay loam (3.3%). Soils were categorized into three pH classes. It was found that 43.5% of area was under strongly acidic soils followed by very strongly acidic soils in 29.1% of area and moderately acidic soils in 16.4% of area. Strong soil acidity is mostly imparted from considerable amount of Al3+ in the exchange complex. Soils were categorized into two organic carbon classes, viz., medium (0.40-0.75%) covering 43.5% of area and high (>0.75%) with 45.5% area. Soils on tea land use were usually high in organic carbon content due to sufficient littering of tea leaves; however, that on nearly level plains under paddy cultivation were medium because of management practices. In flood plains, soils have substantially high organic carbon content as a result of slow rate of decomposition of soil organic matter due to the presence of sufficient soil moisture in both surface and sub-surface layers. It was observed that CEC of soils were low (5.0-10.0 cmol (p+) kg-1) on very gently sloping and nearly level plains under tea, orchards and paddy cultivation, whereas, on upper terrace and flood plains, soils have medium CEC (10.0-15.0 cmol (p+) kg-1) owing to dominance of exchangeable bases like Ca followed by Mg, Na and K in the exchange complex. Soils were categorized into three base saturation classes, viz., less than 35% covering 29.1% of area 35 to 50% covering 43.5% and more than 50% covering 16.4% of area. Well drained soils with high leaching and rapid permeability led to low base saturation status, whereas, imperfectly to poorly drained soils comprised medium to high base saturation owing to concentration of bases in sub-surface layers. Lands were categorized based on USDA capability classification. The land belongs to two class III and IV with subclasses IIIs, IIIw & IVw. Soils on flood plains were assessed for marginally good with severe wetness limitations (w), whereas, soils under tea plantation have moderate limitations of soils (s). Land irrigability was assessed considering topography, flooding, sub-soil drainage, permeability, surface texture and soil depth. Soils on flood plains have been assessed under 3sd subclass, whereas, soils under tea plantation have been assessed under 2st and 2s subclasses. Soils on nearly level plains were assessed under 2sd subclass. The fertility capability classes (FCC) of soils were categorized based on Types (surface texture) and Modifiers (soil reaction, CEC, base saturation, drainage characteristics and Aluminum toxicity). It has been found that a significant portion of the study area covering 220.9 ha (29.1% of TGA) was severely affected by very strongly acidity, low CEC and low base saturation status restricting the cultivation of crops other than tea. Seojipam and Chngmai series were highly suitable for tea.  Changmai series were marginally suitable for banana. Janzi series was moderately suitable for banana, cabbage, potato, rice and tea, whereas, Panitola series were highly to moderately suitable for rice and moderately to marginally suitable for banana, cabbage and potato. Churamoni and Panitola series were highly suitable for rice, marginally for cabbage and banana and not suitable for potato and tea. Alternate land use options are suggested based on interpretation of soil resources as well as socio-economic data of the study area. Tea is suggested to grow in the mapping units of Seojipam and Changmai series, whereas, cultivation of cabbage and potato is suggested after kharif paddy in the mapping units of Janzi and Panitola. Integrated Paddy-cum-Backyard Poultry/ Duckery and short term fishery is suggested in the mapping units of Churamoni series.

 

  1. Land Use Planning of Jorhat District, Assam (NBSS Report No. 1077, 2017)

Planning and management of land resources are integral part of any developmental programme. One of the major global concerns is land degradation and declining land resources for agriculture that are being caused by ever increasing human population growth. Issues related to land use are becoming are increasingly complex. There is an increasing need to use resources in a sustained manner to increase the production while protecting the environment, biodiversity and global climate systems. This requires careful land use planning and decision-making at all levels. Land Use Planning (LUP) allocates uses for different land areas (zone/units), as well as specific interventions (e.g., infrastructure or local works, subsidies, material) that are necessary for carrying out those uses. Its implementation needs an effective land use policy with empowerment of its implementation by State Land Use Boards (SLUB) through District level development organizations. The 53rd National Development Council resolution states that agricultural development strategies must be reoriented to meet the needs of the farmers and calls upon the state governments to formulate District agricultural plan for optimum utilization of available resources. With this background District level Land Use Planning was taken up to develop methodology to evaluate the land resources and to identify the land units for different uses based on socio-economic conditions in relation to the land use objectives, to know the aspirations of district level policy makers/administrators in relation to LUP, to examine the performance of current and future Land Utilization Types and analyze alternate land use options considering all the components of agriculture as well as allied enterprises under different policy options and technological constraints and to prepare an interactive Decision Support System to assist land managers at district level for land allocation. Soil resource map (at 1:50,000 scale) of Jorhat district was grouped into 8 soil units considering landform, texture and internal drainage conditions. These soils are similar in terms of the properties considered in a broader sense. The land use/ land cover map was obtained by visual interpretation and careful delineation of land use land cover boundaries of the district after thorough traversing and ground truth collection using Precision Geo-coded IRS LISS –III imageries (2008-09). Seven major production systems of the district situation were identified under rain-fed situation. Soil and land use /land cover maps with production systems were integrated in GIS environment to identify homogenous units called Land Management Units (LMUs). Village boundaries were overlaid on the LMU map to generate village-wise statistics on LMU's and census and household socio-economic data were linked to LMUs. Stakeholder meetings were also conducted to know the expectations in terms of LUP and socio-economic information regarding different land use types covering all the LMUs, taluks and hobli of the district were also collected. All the LMUs were evaluated for their bio-physical suitability for different crops and potential uses and constraints were identified. Alternate land use options of current and future land utilization types were analyzed by using Multiple Goal Linear Programme (MGLP). Perspective plan for 2024-25 for Jorhat district was prepared considering population growth in the past 20 years, changes in crop acreage and production and land use dynamics for the past 10 years. Integrated LUP for different categories of farmers in each LMU was suggested.  Decision Support System (DSS) of the district was developed by including all the steps as a capsule in MS-Access for district planners. Eight land management units (LMU) were established. All the LMUs were evaluated for identifying economically viable and bio-physically suitable crops and cropping systems.  Different constraints in each farming system were also identified and options to improve the productivity of crops suggested. Bio-physical land suitability assessment suggested that khraif- paddy is highly suitable in LMU-4 and 7 covering 22.3% of TGA of the district, whereas, mustard, potato, rabi-pulses and rabi-vegetables are highly suitable in LMU-1 covering 14.8% of TGA and tea is highly suitable in LMU-5 and 6 covering 12.4% of TGA. Multiple Goal Linear Programme (MGLP) was used to optimize the options with set of given constraints for agricultural development in the district. The following are the goals set for area allocation to different components of agriculture in Jorhat district based on stakeholders’ priorities.

 

  1. Maximum Net Returns (NR) with minimum area under paddy.
  2. Maximum NR with minimum area under paddy+mustard+potato+black gram
  3. NR with minimum area under paddy+rabi-vegetables
  4. NR with minimum area under paddy+mustard+potato+black

gram+rabi-vegetables+plantation crops.

  1. Maximum NR with maximum employment generation.

The model has allocated area for different crops with respect to each goal. Expected net returns per ha was highest (Rs. 65035/-) in case of objective function 5 (with maximum employment generation) and lowest (Rs. 33601/-) in case of objective function 4 (with minimum area under all the crops). Land allocation for rabi-vegetables in rice-fallows of LMU-1, 2, 4 and 7, mustard and potato in rice-fallows of LMU-1 and 3 and citrus in LMU-5, 6, 7 & 8 are expected to produce highly promising net returns as per the model.

Perspective land use plan for 2024-25 was prepared for the district. It has been noticed that population growth followed an increasing trend (14.1%) with a consequent increasing trend of lands under non agricultural uses (21.8%) indicating steady growth of urbanization in the district.  The acreage of HYV of paddy showed encouragingly good positive trends of projection with an increase of 30.8% from the current scenario. Fertilizer consumptions showed highly positive trend with 50.6% in total N-P-K consumptions from the current status of consumptions indicating farmers’ awareness towards achieving more production. The projected net sown area showed a marginally decreasing trend (-0.8%), however, there has been marked increasing trends in projected area sown more than once (19.9%) and projected gross cropped area (5.5%). Henceforth, to enhance agricultural productivity in the district crop diversification has to be encouraged by increasing the area sown more than once to many folds. Considering bio-physical, socio-economic and MGLP output, integrated land use plan was suggested for each LMU. Integrated paddy-livestock-fishery followed by paddy-rabi-vegetables and paddy-potato has been found to be the best suited options for LMU-1 and 2, whereas, paddy-mustard cropping systems are highly suitable for LMU-3. Paddy-rabi vegetable cropping system is alone viable for LMU-4 and also for LMU-7 and 8, appeared to be promising for citrus plantation. Finally, an interactive Decision Support System was developed in MS-access including contingency planning of the district.

Institute funded project
  • Land resource inventory of Ranjuli block, Goalpara district, Assam (at 1:10000 scale) for optimal agricultural land use planning using geo-spatial techniques.
Externally funded project
  • Land resource inventory of Arunachal Pradesh in large scale for agricultural land use planning using geo-spatial techniques
  • Land resource inventory of Lohit district of Arunachal Pradesh in large scale for agricultural land use planning using geo-spatial techniques
  • Land resource inventory of Longding district of Arunachal Pradesh in large scale for agricultural land use planning using geo-spatial techniques
  • Land resource inventory of Tirap district of Arunachal Pradesh in large scale for agricultural land use planning using geo-spatial techniques

  1. Reza, S. K., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R. K., Mukhopadhyay, S. and Ray, S. K. (2020). Soil Organic Carbon Fractions in Major Land Use Systems in Charilam Block of Tripura. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 68(4): 458-461 (2020) (published in 2021).
  2. Gangopadhyay, Samar K. and Ray, S.K. (2020). Soil Chemical and Mineralogical Characteristics under Major Land Use Systems on Upper Brahmaputra Valley of Assam. Clay Research, 39(2): 56-66. (Published in 2021).
  3. Gaikwad, Sujay, S., Prasad Jagdish, Ray, S. K. and Srivastava, Rajeev (2020). Characteristics, Mineralogy and Spectral Properties of Some Typical Vertisols of Vidarbha, Maharashtra, India. Ind. Soc. Soil Sci., 68: 367-384. (Published in 2021).
  4. Ray, Prasenjit, Gogoi, S. N., Bandyopadhyay, S., Jena, R. K., Ramachandran, S., Sharma, G. K., Sah, K. D., Singh, S. K. and Ray, S. K. (2021). Soil-cum-nutrient management package for achieving high yield and quality of mulberry (Morus indica) leaf in acid soil of North Eastern India. Journal of Plant Nutrition (https://doi.org/10.1080/ 01904167.2021.1921196).
  5. Hota. (2021). Participatory problem prioritization for agriculture development in a semi-arid tropical region of south India. The Pharma innovation journal. 10(9): 391-395.
  6. Kumar, A.N. Yadav, R. Mondal, D. Kour, G. Subhramaniam, G.K. Sharma, S. Hota, S. K. Malyan (2021). Myco-remediation: A mechanistic understanding of contaminants alleviation from natural environment and future prospect. Chemosphere. DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.131325.
  7. K. Mourya, R. K. Jena, P. Ray, S. Ramachandran, G. K. Sharma, S. Hota and S. K. Ray (2021). Profile distribution of soil organic carbon fractions under different landforms in the Meghalaya plateau of India. Environment Conservation Journal. 22 (3): 9-16.
  8. Yadav, R. K., Purakayastha, T. J., Ahmed, N., Das, R., Chakrabarty, B., Biswas, S, Sharma, V. K., Singh, P., Talukdar, D., Mourya, K. K., Walia, S. S. (2021). Long-term effect of fertilization and manuring on soil aggregate carbon mineralization. The Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 91(2): 254-257.
  9. Ray, S.K. (2018). Phosphorus in Our Soil Environment. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 66:165-178. (Published in 2020). Excerpts from 5th S. N. Saxena Memorial Lecture delivered by the author organized by the ISSS.
  10. Debroy, P., Jena, R.K., Ray, P., Bandyopadhyay, S., Padua, S., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2020). Vertical distribution of cationic micronutrients across landscape positions on Meghalayan plateau in the North-Eastern Region of India. Journal of Environmental Biology, 41:1089-1098.
  11. Sahoo, Sonalika, Vasu, Duraisamy. Paul, Ranjan, Sen, Tarun Kanti, Ray, Sanjay Kumar and Chandran, Padikkal (2020). Acid Soils of Manipur of the North-eastern Region of India: Their Mineralogy, Pedology. Taxonomy and Edaphology. Clay Research, 39 (1): 31-43.
  12. Kumar, S., Prasad, S., Shrivastava, M., Khariya, S.K and Sharma, G.K. (2020). Consumption pattern of selected vegetables at give sites in Delhi, NCR region. Indian Journal of Agriculture Sciences. 90 (8): 1593–8.
  13. Nogiya, M., Dwivedi, B.S., Datta S.P., Meena, M.C., Das, T.K., Dey, A., Samal, S.K., Chaudhary, M., Sharma, G.K. and Kumar, A. (2020). Immobilization of iron by organic and inorganic amendments under different soil moisture regimes in metal and metalloid contaminated soil. Indian Journal of agriculture Sciences. 90 (6):1190-3.
  14. Sharma, G.K., Khan, S.A., Shrivastava, M., Gupta, N., Kumar, S., Malav, L.C., Nogiya, M., Dubey, S.K. (2020). Bioremediation of sewage wastewater through microalgae (Chlorella minutissima). Indian Journal of Agriculture Sciences. 90 (10): 2024–8.
  15. Malav, L.C., Yadav, K.K., Gupta, N., Kumar, S., Sharma, G.K., Krishnan S., Rezania, S., Kamyab H., Pham, Q.B., Yadav, S., Bhattacharyya, S., Yadav, V.K. and Bach, Q. (2020). A review on municipal solid waste as a renewable source for waste-to-energy project in India: Current practices, challenges, and future opportunities. Journal of Cleaner Production. 277: 123227.
  16. Kumar, U., Mishra, V.N., Kumar N., Jena, R.K., Srivastava, L.K. and Bajpai, R.K. (2019). Characterization and Classification of Soils under Rice-based Cropping Systems in Balod District of Chhattisgarh. Journal of Indian Society of Soil Science. 67(2):228-235.10.5958/0974-0228.2019.00025.2.
  17. Moharana, P. C., Singh, R. S., Singh, S. K., Tailor, B. L., Jena, R. K. and Meena, M. D. (2019). Development of secondary salinity and salt migration in the irrigated landscape of hot arid India. Environmental Earth Sciences. 78:454. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12665-019-8460-4.
  18. Moharana,P. C., Jena, R. K., Pradhan,U. K.,Nogiya,M., Tailor,B. L., Singh,R. S. and Singh, S. K. (2019). Geostatistical and fuzzy clustering approach for delineation of site‑specific management zones and yield‑limiting factors in irrigated hot arid environment of India. Precision Agriculture. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11119-019-09671-9.
  19. Das, A., Biswas, D.R., Sharma, V.K. and Ray, P. (2019) Soil potassium fractions under two contrasting land use systems of Assam. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 89(8): 1340-1343.
  20. Das, A., Biswas, D.R., Das, D., Sharma, V.K., Das, R., Ray, P., Ghosh, A., Mridha, N. and Biswas, S.S. (2019) Assessment of potassium status in soils under different land use systems of Assam. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 89(7): 1077-1081.
  21. P. Priya, Ray, S.K., Choudhari, P.L., Shirale, A.O., Meena, B.P., Biswas, A.K. and Patra, A.K. (2019) Potassium in shrink-swell soils of India: an enigma. Current Scince, 117(4):587-596.
  22. Reza, S.K., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Sah, K.D., Nayak, D.C., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2019) Spatial Distribution of Soil Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium Contents and Stocks in Humid Subtropical North-Eastern India. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 67(1):12-20 DOI: 10.5958/0974-0228.2019.00002.1.
  23. Reza, S.K., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Sah, K.D., Nayak, D.C., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2019) Profile distribution of soil organic carbon in major land use systems in Bishalgarh block, Tripura. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 67(2): 236-239.
  24. Shakeel A. Khan, Gulshan K. Sharma, Fayaz A. Malla, Amit Kumar, Rashmi and N. Gupta. (2019) Biorefinery potential of algal biomass grown in sewage wastewater for phycoremediation, biodiesel and manure production. Journal of Cleaner Production. 211:1412-1419.
  25. Jena, R.K., Padua, S., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Deb Roy, P., Obi Reddy, G.P., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2018) Assessment of soil erosion in sub-tropical ecosystem of Meghalaya, India using remote sensing, GIS and RUSLE. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 46(3):273-282.
  26. Padua, Shelton, Chattopadhyay, T., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K., Ray, P., Roy, P. Dev, Baruah, U., Sah, K.D., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2018) A simplified soil nutrient information system : study from the North East Region of India. Current Science, 114:1241-1249.
  27. Bandyopadhyay, Siladitya, Ray, Prasenjit, Padua, Shelton, Ramachandran, S., Jena, Roomesh Kumar, Roy, P. Deb, Dutta, D.P., Singh, Surendra Kumar and Ray, Sanjay Kumar. (2018) Priority Zoning of Available Micronutreints in the Soils of Agro-ecological Sub-regions of North-East India using Geo-spatial Techniques. Agricultural Research. DOI:10.1007/s40003-018-0327-5.
  28. Gurav, P. Priya, Ray, S.K., Choudhari, P.L., Biswas, A.K. and Shirale, A.O. (2018) A review on soil potassium scenario in verisols of India. Open Access Journal of Science. DOI: 10.15406/oajs.2018.02.00051.
  29. Bandyopadhyay, Siladitya, Ghosh, B.N., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K., Roy, P. Deb, Singh, S.K., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nayak, D.C. and Ray, S.K. (2018) Impact assessment of land resource inventory towards optimizing land use plan in Brahmaputra valley ecosystem, Assam, India. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 46(1):11-24.
  30. Moharana, P.C., Singh, R.S., Singh, S.K., Jena, R.K., Naitam, R.K., Verma, T.P., Nogiya, M., Meena, R.L., Gupta, D.K., Kumar, S., Tailor, B.L. and Singh, R. (2018). Assessment of soil quality monitoring indicators under long term rice cultivation in hot arid Ghaggar-flood plains of India. Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science, 64(4):2030-2044. https://doi.org/10.1080/03650340.2018.1476755.
  31. Vasu, Duraisamy, Tiwary, Pramod, Chandran, Padikkal, Singh, Surendra Kumar, Ray, Sanjay Kumar, Butte, Pravin and Parhad, Vilas (2018) A conceptual model of natural land degradation based on regressive pedogenesis in semiarid tropical environments. Land Degrad. & Dev., DOI:10.1002/Idr.3000 (https://doi.org/10.1002/Idr.3000.
  32. Reza, S.K., Ray, S.K., Nayak, D.C. and Singh, S.K. (2018) Geostsistical and Multivariate Analysis of Heavy Metal Pollution of Coal-mine Affected Soils of North-eastern India. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 66(1):20-27. (DOI:10.5958/0974-0228.2018.00003.8).
  33. Bhattacharyya, T., Ray, S.K., Chandran, P., Karthikeyan, K. and Pal, D.K. (2018) Soil quality and fibrous mineral in black soils of Maharashtra. Current Science, 115(3):482-492.
  34. Gurav, P. Priya, Datta, S.C., Ray, S.K., Choudhari, P.L. and Ahmed, N. (2018) Assessment of potassium release threshold levels of Vertisols (shrink-swell soils) in different agro-ecological regions of India. Applied Clay Science, 165:155-163.
  35. Bandyopadhyay, Siladitya, Ray, P., Padua, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K., Roy, P. Deb, Dutta, D.P., Baruah, U., Sah, K.D., Singh, S.K., Nayak, D.C. and Ray, S.K. (2018) Forms of Acidity in Soils Developed on Different Landforms along an Altitudinal Sequence in Nagaland, India. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 66(2):125-135.
  36. Ray, Prasenjit, Gogoi, S.N., Bandyopadhyay, S., Padua, S., Jena, R.K., Roy, P. Deb., Ramachandran, S., Sharma, G.K., Sah, K.D., Trivedy, K., Singh, S.K. and Ray. S.K. (2018) Fertility status of mulberry (Morus indica L.) growing soils of upper Brahmaputra valley region of north eastern India. Range Management & Agroforestry, 39(2):147-155
  37. Machiwal, S., Kumar, S., Sharma, G.K., Jat, S and Dayal D, (2018) Studying an Indigenous rainwater harvesting system in Banni Grassland of Kachchh, India, Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge.17(3): 559-568.
  38. Dev, R., Sharma, G.K and Singh, T. (2018) Effect of gibberellic acid and oxalic acid on colour retention and storage quality of cold stored fruits of ber cv. Gola. Indian J. Hort. 75(1):124-129.
  39. Vasu, D., Singh, S.K., Tiwary, P., Sahu, N., Ray, S.K., Butte, P. and Duraisami, V.P. (2017) Influence of geochemical processes on hydrochemistry and irrigation  odeling ty of groundwater in place of semi-arid Deccan Plateau, India. Applied Water Science, pp. 1-13. Doi: 10.1007/s13201-017-0528-2.
  40. Satyavathi, P.L.A., Tiwary, P., Bhaskar, B.P., Ray, S.K., Prasad, Jagdish and Bobde, S.V. (2017) Pedotransfer Functions to Estimate Soil Water Retention Characteristics in Major Cotton Growing Shrink-swell Soils of Yavatmal District, Maharashtra. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 65:379-386.
  41. Gurav, P. Priya, Ray, S.K., Choudhari, P.L., Bhattacharyya, T., Chandran, P., Kharche, V.K., Tiwary, P. and Biswas, A.K. (2017) Characterization of some Vertisols of Different Agro-ecological Regions of India. Agropedology, 27:84-92.
  42. Bandyopadhyay, Siladitya, Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2017) Pedogenesis of Some Hydromorphic Soils of Upper Brahmaputra Valley Region, Assam, India. Clay Research, 36:77-89.
  43. Wakode, Roshan, Prasad, Jagdish, Chandran, P., Ray, S.K., Bhattacharyya, T. and Patil, N.G (2017) Mineralogy of Soils along Toposequence in Raipur District of Chattisgarh. Agropedology, 27:167-176.
  44. Nath, A.J., Bhattacharyya, T., Ray, S.K., Deka, Jyotirupa, Das, Ashesh Kumar Das and Devi, Huma. (2016) Assessment of rice farming management practices based on soil organic carbon pool analysis. Tropical Ecology, 57(3): 607-611.
  45. Nath, A.J., Bhattacharyya, T., Deka, Jyotirupa, Das, Ashesh Kumar Das and Ray, S.K. (2016) Management effect on soil organic carbon pools in lowland rain-fed paddy growing soil. Journal of Tropical Agriculture, 53(2): 131-138, 2015.
  46. Padekar, Deepak, Bhattacharyya, T., Ray, S.K., Tiwary, P. and Chandran, P. (2016) Influence of irrigation water on black soils in Amravati district, Maharashtra. Current Science, 110(9): 1740-1755.
  47. Jena, R. K., Duraisami, V.P., Sivasamy, R., Shanmugasundaram, R., Krishnan, R., Padua, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Ray, P., Roy, P. Deb, Singh, S. K. and Ray, S. K. (2016)  Characterization and Classification of Soils of Jirang Block in Meghalaya Plateau, Agropedology, 26 (01), 47-57.
  48. Vasu Duraisamy, Singh, Surendra Kumar, Ray, Sanjay Kumar, Duraisami, V. Perumal, Tiwary, Pramod, Chandran, Paikkal, Nimkar, Anant M. and Anantwar, Shyam G. (2016). Soil quality index (SQI) as a tool to evaluate crop productivity in semi-arid Deccan plateau, India. Geoderma, 282:70-79
  49. Vasu, Duraisamy., Singh, Surendra Kumar., Tiwary, Pramod., Chandran, Padikkal., Ray, Sanjay Kumar and Duraisami, Veppangadu Perumal. (2016) Pedogenic processes and soil-lanform relationships for identification of yield-limiting soil properties. Soil Research, doi: org/10.1071/SR16111.
  50. Thakur, Pravin B., Bhattacharyya, Tapas, Ray, S.K., Chandran, P., Pal, D.K. and Telpande, B.A. (2016) Re-search Shrink-Swell Measurement and Relationship with Soil Properties of Black Clayey Tropical Vertisols. Clay Research, 35(2):37-54.
  51. Ambekar, Abhijit. S., Sridhar D. N., Ray, S.K., Bhattacharyya, T., Anantwar, S.G., Sahu, V. T. and Gaikwad, M. S. (2015) Research Communication: Probable Source of rocks for millstone and cannon balls of goa, India. Current Science, 108, (02):273-282 p.
  52. Bhattacharyya, T., Ray, S.K., Maurya, U.K., Chandran, P., Pal, D.K., Durge, S.L., Nimkar, A.M., Sheikh, S.M., Kuchankar, H.W., Telpande, B., Dongre Vishakha and Kolhe Ashwini (2015) Carbon and nitrogen estimation in soils: Standardizing methods and internal standards for C/N analyzer. J. Indian Chem. Soc., 92:263-269 p.
  53. Bhattacharyya, T., Chandran, P., Ray, S.K., Pal, D.K., Mandal, C. and Mandal, D.K. (2015) Distribution of zeolitic soils in India. Current Science, 109(7):1305-1313.
  54. Bhattacharyya, T., Chandran, P., Ray, S.K., Mandal, C., Tiwary, P., Pal, D.K., Maurya, U.K., Nimkar, A.M., Kuchankar, H., Sheikh, S., Telpande, B.A. and Kolhe Ashwini. (2015) Walkley-Black recovery factor to reassess soil organic matter: Indo-Gangetic Plains and Black Soil Region of India case studies. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 46:2628-2648.
  55. Jena, R. K., Duraisami, V.P., Sivasamy, R., Shanmugasundaram, R., Krishnan, R., Padua, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Ray, P., Roy, P. Deb, Singh, S. K. and Ray, S. K. (2015)  Spatial Variability of soil fertility parameters in Jirang block of Ri-Bhoi district, Meghalaya, Clay Research, 34(1):35-45.
  56. Ramachandran, S. and Biswas, D.R. (2015). Nutrient management on crop productivity and changes in soil organic carbon and soil fertility in a 4-year old maize-wheat cropping in Indo-Gangetic Plains of India”. Journal of Plant Nutrition. DoI: 10,1080/ 01904167.2015.10870.
 

  1. Jena, R.K., Padua, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Ray, P., Deb Roy, P., Chattaraj, S., Sah, K.D., Baruah, U, Singh, S. K. and Ray, S. K. (2020). Land Resource Inventory of Ri-Bhoi District, Meghalaya at 1:10000 scale for Farm Planning. Report No.., ICAR-NBSS & LUP, Nagpur, pp …. (report submitted).
  2. Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2019). Land resource inventory of Charilam block of Sepahijala district, Tripura at 1:10000 scale for farm planning. NBSS Publ. No………., ICAR-NBSS&LUP, Nagpur, pp. ….(report submitted).
  3. Bandyopadhyay, S. Padua, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K., Ray, P., Deb Roy, P., Sah, K.D., Ray, S.K. and Singh, S.K. (2018). Land Resource Inventory of North-West Jorhat Development Block, Jorhat District, Assam at 1: 10,000 scale towards Agricultural Land Use Planning using Geo-spatial techniques. NBSS Publ. ICAR-NBSS&LUP, Nagpur, Maharashtra, pp. (report submitted).
  4. Staff NBSS&LUP, 2017. Land use planning of Jorhat district, Assam. NBSS&LUP Publ. No.1077, February 2017, 92.p.
  5. D., Nayak, D.C., Ray, S.K. and Singh, S.K. (2017). Land resource inventory of Bishalgarh block of Sepahijala district, Tripura at 1:10000 scale for farm planning. NBSS Publ. No., NBSS&LUP, Nagpur, pp. …(report submitted).
  6. Das, T.H., Reza, S.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Baruah, U., Nayak, D.C., Sahoo, A.K., Mukhopadhyay, S., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Chattopadhyay, T., Sah, K.D., Sarkar, D., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2016) Soil Nutrient Mapping of Sikkim, NBSS Publ.1086, January 2016, p.156.
  7. Padua, S., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R. K., Ray, P., Sah, K.D., Baruah, U, Sarkar, D., Singh, S. K. and Ray, S. K. (2016). Land Resource Inventory of Arable Lands of Medziphema Block, Dimapur District, Nagaland for Farm Planning (at 1: 10000 scale). Report No. 1099, ICAR-NBSS & LUP, Nagpur, pp 122.
  8. Baruah, U. et al, Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam towards land use planning. NBSS Publ.1041.
  9. Reza, S.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Ray, P., Mukhopadhyay, S., Sah,
  10. Reza, S.K., Ray, P., Mukhopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R., Nayak, D.C.,
  11. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Hazard assessment of heavy metal contamination by the paper industry, north-eastern India.International Journal of Environmental Studies. DOI:10.1080/00207233.2012.746810. (Taylor and Francis Group, U.K.)
  12. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Spatial variability of soil properties in Brahmaputra plains of North-eastern India: A geostatistical approach. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 60:108-115.
  13. Reza, S.K., Pal, S. and Singh, S. (2012). Rock phosphate-enriched pressmud compost: Direct effect in pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) and residual effect in mustard (Brassica juncea) in a Typic Haplustept. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, 60: 138-144.
  14. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U. and Sarkar, D. (2012). Mapping risk of soil phosphorus deficiency using geostatistical approach: A case study of Brahmaputra plain, Assam, India. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 40:65-69.
  15. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Dutta, D.P. (2011). Influence of slope positions on soil fertility index, soil evaluation factor and microbial indice in acid soil of Humid Subtropical India. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 39:44-49.
  16. Panwar, P., Pal, S., Reza, S.K. and Sharma, B. (2011). Soil fertility index, soil evaluation factor, and microbial indices under different land uses in acidic soil of Humid Subtropical India. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 42:2724–2737.
  17. Pal, S., Datta, S.C. and Reza, S.K. (2011). Interrelationship of organic acids and aluminum concentrations in rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere soil solution of rice in acidic soil. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 42:932–944.
  18. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Raja, P. and Sarkar, D. (2010). Remote Sensing and GIS in the Management of Wetland Resources of Majuli Island, Assam, India. Tropical Ecology, 5:31-40.
  19. Chattaopadhyay, T., Varadachari C. and Ghosh, K. (2010). Complexation  of humic substances by allophone. Clay Research 29 ( 1&2) , 15-22 p.
  20. Sahoo, A.K., Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U and Butte, P.S. (2010). Characterization, classification and evaluation of soils of Langol Hill, Manipur for rational land use planning.Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science 58, pp 355-362.
  21. Reza, S.K., Ahmed, N. and Pal, S. (2010). Evaluation of pedological development of soils developed on lower reaches of Siwalik hills through filed morphological rating system. Indian Journal of Soil Conservation, 38:101-104.
  22. Reza, S.K., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Das, T.H. (2010). Evaluation and comparison of ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting methods for predication of spatial variability of some chemical parameters of Dhalai district, Tripura. Agropedology, 20: 38-48.
  23. Pal, S., Patra, A.K., Reza, S.K., Wildi, W. and Poté, J. (2010). Use of Bio-Resources for Remediation of Soil Pollution. Natural Resources, 1:110-125.
  24. Reza, S.K., Ahmed, N. and Pal, S. (2010). Characterization, classification and mapping of soils of Panja-Rao watershed, Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh. Agropedology, 20:124-132.
  25. Varadachari, C., Saha, S., Bandyopadhay, S. and Ghosh, K. (2009). Bio-release Multi-nutrient Fertilizers for High Altitude Agriculture. Mountain Research and Development, Vol 29 (3), International Mountain society, Switzerland,
  26. Kandeepan, G., Shahnawaz Ali, Shiv Lal, Bandyopadhyay, S., Kharbikar, L. and Ahmed, I. (2009). An innovative approach to supply biogas (gober gas) in rubber balloons for domestic use: A case study & success story. Paper presented in Souvenir of National Seminar on "Wealth from livestock and agriculture waste" at VC& RI (TANUVAS) Namakkal, Tamil Nadu.
  27. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Raja, P. and Sarkar, Dipak (2009). Pedogenesis in Some Subaqueous Soils of Brahamaputra Valley of Assam. J. of Indian Soc. of Soil Science, 57:237-244.
  28. Bhaskar, B.P., Saxena, R.K., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, Utpal, Sarkar, D., Raja, P. and Butte, P.S. (2009). Intricacy in Classification of Pine Growing Soils in Shillong Plateau, Meghalaya, India. Soil Survey Horizons, Spring Issue, 11-16 (under Aegis of SSS of American Journal).
  29. Bandyopadhay, S., Bhattacharya, I, Varadachari, C. and Ghosh, K. (2008). New Slow-releasing Molybdenum Fertilizer. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol 56 (4), pp 1343-1349,  American Chemical Society.
  30. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, Utpal, Vadivelu, S. and Sarkar, D. (2007). Characterization and Depositional Soils in Dynamic Fluvial Landforms of Majuli Island for Land Use Related Issues. Agropedology, 18:33-43.
  31. Bhattacharya, I., Bandyopadhay, S., Varadachari, C. and Ghosh, K. (2007). Development of a Novel Slow-releasing Iron-Manganese Fertilizer Compound. Industrial Engineering and Chemistry Research, Vol 46, pp 2870-2876, American Chemical Society.
  32. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2006). Mapping and Profile Distribution of Potassium Forms in Hill Land Soils of Narang –Kongripara Watershed, Meghalaya. J. of Potassium Research.
  33. Singh, R.S., Dubey, P.N., Sen, T.K., and Maji, A.K. (2006). Distribution of potassium in soils of Manipur encompassing physiographic and hydrothermal variations. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 54:197-202.
  34. Baruah Utpal, Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S. and Mishra, J.P. (2006). Land Evaluation for Rapeseed (Brassica campestins L.) and Mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in Nagaon District, Assam. Agropedology. No.15 1163-69.
  35. Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S. and Mishra, J.P. (2005). Land evaluation for rapeseed/mustard in Nagaon district, Assam. Agropedology, 15:63-69.
  36. Bhaskar, B.P., Baruah, U., Vadively, S. and Butte, P.S. (2005).Characterization of soils in the ‘Bil’ environment of Brahmaputra valley in Jorhat district, Assam for land use interpretation. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 53:3-10.
  37. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D. and Butte, P.S. (2005). Evaluation of soil suitability to Rice-based cropping in the River island, Majuli, Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 53:35-40.
  38. Vadivelu, S., Mishra, J.P., Thampi, J. and Baruah, U. (2005). Suitable cropping system for Rice fallow of Brahmaputra valley. J. of Agricultural Resource Management. 4.
  39. Bhaskar, B.P., Mishra, J.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Sen, T.K., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Soils on Jhum cultivated hill slope of Narang-Kongripara watershed in Meghalaya. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 52:125-133.
  40. Bhaskar, B.P., Saxena, R.K., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Putte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Pedogenesis in high altitude soils of Meghalaya Plateau.Agropedology, 14:9-23.
  41. Mishra, J.P., Baruah, U., Vadivelu, S., Bhaskar, B.P. and Tomar, S.S. (2004). Exploiting rice fallows of Brahmaputra valley of Assam – opportunities and constraints. Indian Farming. 54:3-8.
  42. Vadivelu, S., Sharma, J.P., Raja, P., Bhaskar, B.P., Gajbhiye, K.S., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D., Butte, P.S. and Dutta, D.P. (2004). Soil-site suitability evaluation in two different agro-ecological systems and relevance of the parameters. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 52:177-183.
  43. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N., Nayak, D.C., Baruah, U., Bhattacharyya, T., Maji, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2003). Soil resource information for agricultural planning and development of Assam. Agropedology, 13:50-59.
  44. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D., Walia, C.S., Nayak, D.C. and Maji, .K. (2003). A land use plan for Jorhat district of Assam state. Agropedology, 13:1-10.
  45. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U, Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, J., Sarkar, D., Walia, C.S., Nayak, D.C. and Maji, A.K. (2003). A Land Use Plan for Jorhat District of Assam State. Agropedology, (2003), 13, 1-10.
  46. Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Sahoo, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2002). Characteristics and classification of soils of Loktak catchment area of Manipur for sustainable land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 50:196-204.
  47. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N. and Chatterji, S. (2002). Forms and distribution of phosphorus in some acid soils in Manipur and Assam. Agropedology,12:122-127.
  48. Sarkar, Dipak, Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Sahoo, A.K. and Velayutham, M. (2002). Characteristics and classification of soils of Loktak catchment area of Manipur for sustainable land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Science, Vol.50, No.2. pp.196-204.
  49. Bhaskar,B.P., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Butte, P.S., Dutta, D.P. and Mishra, J.P. (2001). Distribution of Potassium forms in Chars and Marshy soils of Brahmaputra valley, Jorhat district, Assam. Journal of Potassium Research, Vol.17, No.1 to 4. pp.39-47.
  50. Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Sarkar, D. and Butte, P.S. (2001). Delineation and characterization of flood deposited sediments in Dhemaji district, Assam.J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 49:521-524.
  51. Vadivelu, S., Sen, T.K., Bhaskar, B.P., Thampi, Jiji, Baruah, U. and Mishra, J.P. (2001). Mapping of available potassium in the soils of Assam.Agropedology, 12:29-37.
  52. Gangpadhayay, S.K., Baruah, U., Nayak, D.C., Sen, T.K., Singh, R.S., Maji, A.K. and Sarkar, D. (2000). Soils of North-Eastern India – their characteristics, problems and potential. Indian J. Landscape System, 22:65-75.
  53. Bhaskar, B.P., Vadivelu, S., Baruah, U., Butte, P.S., Dutta, D.P. and Mishra, J.P.  (2000). Distribution of potassium forms in chars and marshy soils of Brahmaputra valley, Jorhat Distt. Assam. J. Potassium Res., 17:39-47.
  54. Baruah, U. and Vadivelu, S. (1999). Soil map for sustainable rice production in Assam. J. Hill Geogr., XV:20-24.
  55. Gangopadhyay, S.K., Bhattacharyya, T. and Sarkar, Dipak. (1999). Characteristics and classification of some forest soils of South Tripura. Van Vighan, 37:11-17.
  56. Bhattacharyya, T., Dubey, P.N., Das, T.K., Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S.K. and Kumar, D. (1998). Soil formation as influenced by geomorphic processes in the Brahmaputra flood plains of Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 46:647-657.
  57. Bhattacharyya, T., Mukhopadhyay, S., Baruah, U. and Chamuah, G.S. (1998). Need for soil study to determine degradation and landscape stability.Current Sci. 74:42-47.
  58. Bhattacharyya, T., Sarkar, D., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Dubey, P.N., Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nayak, D.C., Maji, A.K., Saxena, R.K., Barthwal, A.K., Krishna,.N.D.R., Mandal, C., Sehgal, J., Bhowmick, K.R., Sinha, K., Chakraborty, S., Nandi Mazumdar, S., Pal, P.K., Krishna Kumar, A.K. and Sethuraj, M.R. (1998). Soils of Tripura-1. Characterisation and Classification Agropedology, 8:47-54.
  59. Bhattacharyya, T., Sarkar, D., Gangopadhyay, S.K., Dubey, P.N., Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Nayak, D.C., Maji, A.K., Saxena, R.K., Barthwal, A.K., Krishna,.N.D.R., Mandal, C., Sehgal, J., Bhowmick, K.R., Sinha, K., Chakraborty, S., Nandi Mazumdar, S., Pal, P.K., Krishna Kumar, A.K. and Sethuraj, M.R. (1998). Soils of Tripura-II. Suitability for Rubber. Agropedology, 8:55-60.
  60. Gangopadhyay, S.K., Walia, C.S., Chamuah, G.S. and Baruah, U. (1998). Rice growing soils of Upper Brahmaputra valley of Assam: their characteristics and suitability. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 46:103-109.
  61. Sen, T.K., Dubey, P.N., Maji, A.K. and Chamuah, G.S. (1997). Status of micronutrients in some dominant soils of Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:245-249.
  62. Sen, T.K., Nayak, D.C., Singh, R.S., Dubey, P.N., Maji, A.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1997). Pedology and edaphology of benchmark acid sols of north-eastern India. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:782-790.
  63. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1997). Characteristics and classification of some soils derived from different parent materials in Arunachal Pradesh.J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 45:401-404.
  64. Bhattacharyya, T., Baruah, U., Gangopadhyay, S., Dileep Kumar (1997). Characterization of some Aquepts occurring in Assam valley. Journal of the Indian Society of Soil Science, Vol.45, No.4. pp.791-796.
  65. Baruah, U. and Mahapatra A.C. (1996). Slope mass movement and associated soils in east Khasi and Jaintia Hills of Meghalaya. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:712-717.
  66. Chamuah, G.S., Dubey, P.N., Walia, C.S. and Sen, T.K. (1996). Relationship between soil pH and base saturation as affected by topography.Agropedology, 6:121-123.
  67. Nayak, D.C., Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Nature of soil acidity in some soils of Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:209-214.
  68. Sen, T.K., Baruah, U., Maji, A.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Remote sensing approach to detect temporal changes in the course of the Brahmaputra river. Agropedology, 6:23-28.
  69. Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S., Nayak, D.C., Singh, R.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Characteristics and classification of some soils of Manipur valley. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:538-541.
  70. Sen, T.K., Nayak, D.C., Dubey, P.N., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1996). Highly leached mineral soils of Manipur – their pedology, characteristics, problems and management. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:718-722.
  71. Walia, C.S. and hamuah, G.S. (1996). Characterization of some Inceptisols of Arunachal hills. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 44:179-182.
  72. Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S. and Sen, T.K. (1995). Climatic zones of north-east India using water balance studies. Geogr. Rev. India, 41:45-53.
  73. Baruah, U., Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1995). Land use potentials of Kamrup district of Assam. Natl. Geogr. J. India, 41:155-161.
  74. Bhattacharyya, T. and Ghosh, S.K. (1994). Nature and characteristics of naturally occurring clay-organic complex of two soils from north-eastern region. Clay Res., 13:1-9.
  75. Bhattacharyya, T., Sen, T.K., Singh, R.S., Nayak, D.C. and Sehgal, J. (1994). Morphology and classification of Ultisols with Kandic Horizon in North East Region. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:301-306.
  76. Sen, T.K., Chamuah, G.S. and Sehgal, J.L. (1994). Occurrence and characteristic of some Kandi soils in Manipur. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:297-300.
  77. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1994). Soils reverine plain in Arunachal Pradesh and their suitability for some agricultural crops. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 42:425-429.
  78. Nair, K.M. and Chamuah, G.S. (1993). Exchangeable aluminium in soils of Meghalaya and management of Al3+ related productivity constraints. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 41:331-334.
  79. Baruah, U., Chamuah, G.S. and Maji, A.K. (1992). Variability in surface soil properties related to geomorphology in north-east India. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:881-884.
  80. Sen, T.K., Pande, L.M., Sehgal, J.L., Maji, A.K. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Satellite remote sensing in soil resource inventory of Dibrugarh dist. (Part), Assam. Photonirvachak, 20:95-104.
  81. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Flood affected soils of Brahmaputra valley and their suitability for land use planning. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:335-340.
  82. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1992). Soil profile development in relation to land   use. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40:220-222.
  83. Singh, R.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1991). Morphology and characteristics of some soils on different landforms in Kamrup district, Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 39:209-211.
  84. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1991). Soil and land suitability evaluation for plantation crops. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 39:404-407.
  85. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1990). Characteristics, classification and suitability for land use planning of foothill soils. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 38:286-292.
  86. Chamuah, G.S., Borthakur, H.P., Walia, C.S., Nair, K.M. and Phukan, B.N. (1989). Assessment of soil survey information in crop response to applied nutrients. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 37:87-91.
  87. Nair, K.M., Chamuah, G.S. and Deshmukh, S.N. (1989). Forest soils of Meghalaya, their characterization, classification and constraints to productivity.Van Vigyan, 27:34-41.
  88. Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Effect of liming and method of nitrogen application on dwarf rice grown on Inceptisols. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:185-186.
  89. Chamuah, G.S. and Dey, S.K. (1988). Effect of some metabolic inhititors on cation exchange capacity of plant roots. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:225-227.
  90. Nair, K.M. and Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Characteristics and classification of some pine forest soils of Meghalaya J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:142-145.
  91. Walia, C.S. and Chamuah, G.S. (1988). Influence of topography on catenary soils in old flood-plain of Assam. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 36:825-827.
  92. Chamuah, G.S. (1987). Potassium status of some soils growing rice. J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci. 35:132-134.
Technical Bulletins
  1. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Sonitpur District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (A).
  2. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Darrang District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (B).
  3. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Goalpara District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (C).
  4. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Kokrajhar District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (D).
  5. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Bangaigaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (E).
  6. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Barpeta District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (F).
  7. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Nalbari District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (G).
  8. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Marigaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (H).
  9. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Nagaon District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (I).
  10. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Lakhimpur District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (J).
  11. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Dhemaji District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (K).
  12. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Tinsukia District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (L).
  13. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Karbi-Anglong District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (M).
  14. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Chirang District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (N).
  15. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Bagsa District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (O).
  16. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micro nutrients for the thirteen (13) priority districts of Assam state (1:50,000 scale) towards optimum land use planning: Udalguri District. (2012). Report No. 1041 (P).
  17. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: West District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (a). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  18. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: North District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (b). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  19. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: South District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (c). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  20. Assessment and mapping of some important soil parameters including macro and micronutrients for optimum land use planning of Tripura state: Dhalai District. (2010). Report No. 1031 (d). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  21. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, West District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031 (a), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  22. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, North District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031 (b), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  23. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, South District, Tripura (2010). Report No.1031(c), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  24. Assessment and Mapping of Some Important Soil Parameters including Macro and Micronutrients for Optimum Land Use Planning, Dhalai District, Tripura. (2010). Report No.1031 (d), NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  25. Soil Survey of Bhareli River basin, Assam for land use planning. 2008, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  26. Soils of Research Farms of ICAR Complex for North Eastern Hill Area, Jharnapani and NRC for Mithun, Medziphema, Nagaland for Optimizing Land Use (2008). Report No.1012, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  27. Detail Soil Survey of Research Farm for Optimizing Land Use at Soil Conservation Training Institute, Byrnihat, Meghalaya (2008). Report No.1013, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  28. Detailed soil survey report of (i) ICAR Complex farm, Jharnapani and NRC Mithun farm, Medziphema, Nagaland. Report No. 1012, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  29. Detail Soil Survey of Research Farm, Regional Rainfed Low Land Rice Research Station, Gerua, Kamrup District, Assam (2008). Report No.1024, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  30. Characterizing the soil resources in the dynamic fluvial land forms of Majuli Island for land use related issues using Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System (2006). Report No.949, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  31. Land use planning of Cherrapunji, Meghalaya – Soil Resources and Agro-Ecological assessment. (2006). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.131. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  32. Soil Series of Manipur. (2006). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.134. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  33. Reflectance Libraries for Development of Soils and Chars for Periodic Assessment of Soil Resources (2005). Report No.810, NBSS&LUP, ICAR, Nagpur.
  34. Impact of Fluvial Processes on Land Formation with Spatial Reference to Chars and Bils in the Brahmaputra Valley (2005). Report No.850, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  35. Soils of Krishnagiri Farm, Longol Hill, ICAR Complex, Manipur (2005). Report No.851, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  36. Soil Resource Inventory of Some Command Area (Charaipani, Deogharia and Bengenakhowa) of Titabar Tehsil, Jorhat District, Assam (2004). Report No.699, NBSS&LUP, ICAR, Nagpur.
  37. Soil Series of Meghalaya. (2005). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.121. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  38. Soil Erosion of Assam. (2005). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.118. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  39. Rainfed Rice Production System (NATP-RRPS-17) (2004). Report No.796, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  40. Soils of Optimizing Land Use of Kamrup District, Assam (2008). Report No.604, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  41. Soil Series of Assam. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.101. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  42. Soil Series of Sikkim. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.105. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  43. Soil resource Atlas of Jorhat District. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.107. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  44. Soil Series of Nagaland. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.109. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  45. Soil Series of Tripura. (2004). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.111. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  46. Identification, characterization, delineation of agro-economic constraints of oilseed based production system in rainfed eco-system. NATP Project ROPS-II (2003). Report No.629, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  47. Land use planning for management of agricultural resources (Hill & Mountain Eco-system), Narang-Kongripara Watershed, Ri-bhoi District, Meghalaya (2003). NATP MM-III, 28, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  48. Land Capability of Catchment of Loktak Lake, Manipur (2002). Report No.594,  NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  49. Soil Erosion of Tripura, a Model for Soil Conservation and Crop Performance. (2002). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.97. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  50. Soils of Mizoram for optimizing land use. (2001). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.75b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  51. Soils of Nagaland for optimizing land use. (2000). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.67b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  52. Sand deposition by floods in Dhemaji district of Assam. (1999). NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  53. Soils of Assam for optimizing land use. (1999). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.66b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  54. Soils of Meghalaya for optimizing land use. (1999). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.52b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  55. Soils of Arunachal Pradesh for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.55b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  56. Soils of Manipur for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.56c. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  57. Soils of Sikkim for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.60b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  58. Soils of Tripura for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.65b. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  59. Soils of Tripura for optimizing land use. (1996). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.65a & c. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  60. Soil Survey Report of Sibsagar District, Assam (1995). Report No.529, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  61. Soil Survey Report of Morigaon District, Assam (1994). Report No.527, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  62. District Soil Survey Report of Jorhat for Land Use Planning. Report No.526,  NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  63. Soil Survey Report of Lohit District (Part), Arunachal Pradesh (1991). Report No.521, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  64. Soil Survey & Land Evaluation of Mopakhat Project, Kanubari Circle, District- Tirap, Arunachal Pradesh (1990). Report No.518, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  65. Soil Survey Report of Longding and Wakha Circle, District- Tirap, Arunachal Pradesh (1989). Report No.512, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  66. Soils of Buralikson Sugarcane Farm, AAU, District- Golaghat (1989). Report No.513, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  67. Soil Survey Report of Livestock Research Station Farm, AAU at Village Mondira, PS- Boko, District- Kamrup, Assam. (1987). Report No.497, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  68. Soil Survey Report of Honowal Tea Estate, Bhogdoi Watershed, Mariani Thana, Jorhat District, Assam. (1984). Report No.468, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  69. Soil Survey Report of Banana Progenui Orchard- cum Nursary Farm, Kheroni, Karbi Anglong District, Assam. (1984). Report No.465, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  70. Soil Survey Report of Majuli Sub-division, Jorhat District, Assam (1984). Report No.469, NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.
  71. Soils of North Eastern Regions. (1981). NBSS&LUP Publ.No.2. NBSS&LUP, (ICAR), Nagpur.

  1. Rani, A., Kumar, N., Singh, S.K., Sinha, N.K., Jena, R.K. and Patra, H. (2019). Remote Sensing data analysis in R. New India Publishing Agency. ISBN: 978-93-87973.

  1. Hota, G. K. Sharma, G. Subrahmanyam, A. Kumar, A. A. Shabnam, P. Baruah. (2021). Fungal communities for bioremediation of contaminated soil for sustainable environments. Recent Trends in Mycological Research, 27-42.
  2. Hota (2021). Synchrotron Based Techniques in Soil Analysis: A Modern approach. In. Technology in Agriculture. Intechopen.
  3. Sharma, G.K., Jena, R., Hota, S., Kumar, A., Ray, P., Fagodiya, R.K., Malav, L.C., Yadav, K.K., Gupta, D.K., and Khan, S.A. (2020). Recent Development in Bioremediation of Soil Pollutants through Biochar for Environmental Sustainability. In: Singh J., Singh C. (eds.) Biochar Applications in Agriculture and Environment Management. Springer, Cham. 123-140.
  4. Gupta, D.K., Gupta, C.K., Dubey, R., Fagodiya, R.K., Sharma, G.K., Keerthika, A., Noor Mohamad, M.B., Dev, R. and Shukla A.K. (2020). Role of Biochar in Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. In: Singh J., Singh C. (eds.) Biochar Applications in Agriculture and Environment Management. Springer, Cham. 141-164.
  5. Dubey, R., Gupta, D. and Sharma, G.K. (2020). Chemical Stress on Plants. Rakshit, A., Singh, H., Singh, A.K., Singh, U.S., Fraceto, L. (eds.) New Frontiers in Stress Management for Durable Agriculture. Springer, Cham.101-128.
  6. Sharma, G.K., Jena, R., Hota, S., Kumar, A., Ray, P., Fagodiya, R.K., Malav, L.C., Yadav, K.K., Gupta, D.K., Khan, S.A. and Ray, S.K. (2020) Recent Development in Bioremediation of Soil Pollutants through Biochar for Environmental Sustainability. In: Singh J., Singh C. (eds) Biochar Applications in Agriculture and Environment Management. Springer, Cham. pp 123-140.
  7. Dubey, R., Gupta, D. and Sharma, G.K. (2020) Chemical Stress on Plants. Rakshit, A., Singh, H., Singh, A.K., Singh, U.S., Fraceto, L. (eds) New Frontiers in Stress Management for Durable Agriculture. Springer, Cham.
  8. Gupta, D.K., Gupta, C.K., Dubey, R., Fagodiya, R.K., Sharma, G.K., Keerthika, A., Noor Mohamad, M.B., Dev, R. and Shukla A.K. (2020) Role of Biochar in Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. In: Singh J., Singh C. (eds) Biochar Applications in Agriculture and Environment Management. Springer, Cham. pp 141-165.
  9. Pramanik P., Ray P., Maity A., Das S., Ramakrishnan S., Dixit P. (2020) Nanotechnology for Improved Carbon Management in Soil. In: Ghosh P., Mahanta S., Mandal D., Mandal B., Ramakrishnan S. (eds) Carbon Management in Tropical and Sub-Tropical Terrestrial Systems. Springer, Singapore.
  10. Kumar, U., Kumar, N., Mishra, V.N. and Jena, R.K. (2019). Soil Quality Assessment using Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP): A Case Study. In: Bhattacharjee, V., De, S. K., Joshi, V., Karn, B., Kumar, N., Mipun, B. S., Mukul, M., Champati Ray, P.K. (eds.) Interdisciplinary Approaches to Information Systems & Software Engineering. IGI Global Publications. ISBN13:9781522577843.DOI:10-4018/978-1-5225-7784-3.
  11. Sharma, G.K. and Dhanya M.S. (2019). “Impacts of large scale exploitation of hydropower and other renewable energy sources”. Energy and Environment V.K Garg and Ashok Dhawan. UGC, MHRD, 2019. pp1-13.
  12. S., Singh, S.K., Ray, S.K., Ramamurthy, V., Daripa, A. and G.P. Obi Reddy (2018) Geospatial Technologies for Semiautomated Baseline Database Generation for Large Scale Land Resource Inventory. Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature. pp 253-271.
  13. Sharma, G.K., Dayal, D., Machiwal, D., Dev, R., Singh, T. and Singhal T. (2017) "Bioremediation Strategies for Treatment of Polluted Soils and Water Resources In Dryland Areas". Bioremediation Strategies for Treatment of Polluted Soils and Water Resources in Dryland Areas. Shamsudheen Mangalassery, Devi Dayal and Deepesh Machiwal. 1st ed. Kalyani,(2017). pp 244-260.
  14. Singh, S.K., Chatrtaraj, S., Patil, N.G., Ray, S.K. and Chatterji, S. (2016) Soils of India: Problems and Potentialities. In Ed. R. Lal Encyclopedia of Soil Science, Third Edition, CRC Press, ISBN 9781498738903.
  15. Bandyopadhyay, S., Ray, P. and Ray, S. K. (2016) Need of soil study for integrating agri-horticultural research vis-à-vis climate change in north east region of India, In National Seminar on Integrating Agri-Horticultural and Allied Research for Food and Nutritional Security in the Era of Global Climate Disruption, organized by ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Umroi Road, Umiam, Meghalaya at Imphal, Manipur, 4-6 March, 2016.

  1. Hota, S. Ramachandran, R. K. Jena, P. Ray, K. K. Mourya, G. K. Sharma and S.K. Ray (2021, May). Banana Cultivation in Goalpara aspirational district of Assam: Problems and Prospects.
  2. Reza, S.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Mukhopadhyay, S. and Ray, S.K. (2020). Delineation of Land Management Units for Alternate Land Use Options: A Case Study of Bishalgarh Block in Sepahijala District, Tripura. Agriculture Observer, August 2020:118-123.
  3. Ray, S.K. (2020). Soil Memory Reveals. In “Thought Process” published by State Innovation and Transformation Aayog, Govt. of Assam,
  4. Ray, Prasenjit, Hota, Surabhi, Mourya, K.K. and Ray, S.K. (2020). Kiphire aspirational district of Nagaland: Does soil health status help to formulate strategies for agricultural development. Indian Farming 70 (05):20-22.
  5. Moharana, P.C., Singh, R.S., Jena, R.K., Tailor, B.L. and Singh, S.K. (2019). Secondary Salinity and Waterlogging in the IGNP command area: A threat to agricultural sustainability. Indian Farming: 69(09): 40-43.
  6. Bandyopadhyay, S., Ray, Prasenjit, Baruah, Amitabh and Ray, S.K. (2018) Bharatar Uttar-Pub Anchalat Zalabayu Paribartanar Lagat Sangati Rakhi Kara Krishi-Uddyan Haishyar Anusandhanar Ekatrikaranar Karane Mati Adhyanar Prayujaniyata. SAAR BATORI, Fertilizer Association of India, Kolkata, July-Sept, 2018:5-12. (Three monthly magazine).
  7. Reza, S.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ray, P., Ramachandran, S., Mukhopadhyay, S., Sah, K.D., Nayak, D.C., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2018) Rubber Growing Soils of Bishalgarh Block, Sepahijala District, Tripura : Their Characteristics, Suitability and Management. Field Forester, 3(1):180-184.
  8. Ray, P., Sharma, G.K., Bandyopadhyay, S., Ramachandran, S., Jena, R.K. and Singh, S.K. (2018) Agricultural land use planning- an effective means of enhancing tribal farmers' income in Asom. Indian Farming, ICAR, New Delhi, 68(1): 88-90.
  9. Sharma, G.K., Dev R., Dayal, D. and Singh. T. (2018) Enhancing solubility of low grade Phosphorus minerals for their utilization as plant nutrients, Indian Farming Journal, ICAR, New Delhi, 68(07): 24-26.
  10. Sharma, G.K., Shamsudheen, M., Machiwal, D., Dev R. and Dayal. D. (2018) Salinity: Impact and mitigation strategy in Kachchh (arid) region. Kisan Gyan, Karnal, 18-20.
  11. Bandyopadhyay, S., Baruah, A., P. Ray, Jena, R.K., Ramachandran, S., Roy, P. Deb, Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2017). Asomor Matir Pustir Manachitrakaran : Eti Saphal Prayash.
  12. Dev, R., Sharma, G.K and Dayal, D. (2017) Date palm: Post harvest value addition for better income. KisanGyan, Karnal. 10-13.
  13. Machiwal, S., Kumar, S., Sharma, G.K and Dayal D. (2017) Virda- Kachchh me ParamaparikVarshajalSangrahanKaTatrika, Kheti, ICAR, New Delhi, 70(4):43-46.
  14. Sharma, G.K., Dev, R and Dayal, D. (2017) Microalgae: Potential source of third generation Biofuel, Indian Farming, ICAR, New Delhi, 67(11): 15-17.
  15. Singh, T., Dev, R., Sharma, G.K and Dayal, D. (2017) Safflower emerging oilseed crop in Kachchh region, Kheti, ICAR, New Delhi, 35-40.
  16. Singh, T., Dev, R., Sharma, G.K and Dayal, D. (2017) Safflower –new emerging oilseed crop for Kachchh region ICAR, New Delhi, 35-40.
  17. Bandyopadhyay, S., Ray, P., Padua, S., Jena, R.K., Sah, K.D., Baruah,U., Singh, S.K. and Ray, S.K. (2016). Agro-technology Transfer through tribal sub-plan. Indian Farming, 66(2): 42-44.
  18. Chandran P., Mandal C., Bhattacharyya T., Ray S.K. and Tiwari P. (2015).Land Resource Data Storage Devise: for Sustainable Agricultural Planning. Indian Farming, 64(11): 33-34.
  19. Ray S.K., Mandal D.K., Tiwari P., Chandran P., and Bhattacharyya T. (2015).Soil and Land Quality: for Sustainable Crop production. Indian Forming, 64(11): 29-30.
  20. Tiwari P., Patil N.G., Ray S.K., Chandran P., and Bhattacharyya T. (2015). Soil Water Assessment: for Crop Planning in Black Soils. Indian Forming, 64 (11): 21-22.